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Montessori Basics 8: Pink, Blue, and Green Series

September 21, 2013 Leave a comment

Source: http://www.blog.montessoriforeveryone.com/montessori-basics-8-pink-blue-and-green-series.html

Montessori Basics 8: Pink, Blue, and Green Series

The Pink, Blue, and Green Series work is an integral part of Montessori language. Many people have questions about these materials, though. They don’t seem quite as self-explanatory as other common Montessori work. There’s a lot to know about the history and usage of these materials – so read on for more info!

When Maria Montessori began working with the children in the first Casa dei Bambini (Children’s House), she gave them sandpaper letters to trace while saying the correct sound. She didn’t do any specific work in the area of reading, but almost effortlessly, the children began to read. Italian is a very phonetic language (words are spelled the way they sound), and once the children knew the sounds, they could read.

After the Montessori method was brought to the United States in the 1920s, it was clear that another approach was needed to teach reading and writing in English. While there are many phonetically spelled words in English, there are even more that use “phonemes”; that is, groups of letters that create distinct sounds when combined. For instance, “ough” can make several sounds, as in “through” or “bough”. These sounds need to be memorized; they can’t be sounded out phonetically.

The Pink, Blue, and Green Series materials were developed to meet that need. They break down the essentials of English phonics into three groups: short vowel sounds, consonant blends, and phonetic combinations. By moving through these materials in order, a child is able to easily master the art of reading and writing in English.

The Pink Series materials are where it all begins. Pink Series words consist of three letters: a beginning and ending consonant, and a vowel in the middle. All of the vowel sounds in this series are short vowels: “a” as in “cat”; “e” as in “bed”, “i” as in “pig”, “o” as in “hot”, and “u” as in “bus”. The letter “y” is not included in this grouping.

After mastering the Pink Series, the child is ready to move to Blue Series words. These words consist of consonant blends (at the beginning or end of the word, or both), and a short vowel sound. Examples would include “flag”, “mend”, and “clock”. There are about 20 different blends, if you include doubles like “ll” and “ss”. The child may work on this step for quite awhile, as there are hundreds of words that fit into this scheme (see picture for an example of Blue Series matching cards).

Once the Blue Series words have been mastered (essentially, that means the child is familiar with all the blends and can spell most Blue Series Words), they are ready for Green Series. The Green Series is where reading fluency really begins, as the child now has the keys to unlock the inconsistencies and idiosyncrasies of the English language.

The Green Series words consist of all the major phonemes, for example: “ai”, “ou”, “ie”, and “ow”. It also includes vowel combinations with a consonant in the middle, like “a_e” or “i_e” where the “_” is a consonant. These would be words like “cake” or “mice“. It includes silent letters, hard and soft letters, and many other difficult spelling and reading challenges. There are about 40-50 different sound combinations in this group.

There is a huge variety of Pink, Blue, and Green Series work. Common ones include matching cards, rhyming cards, using the movable alphabet to spell words, cards with lists of words for spelling or reading practice, and word cards with matching objects. Materials differ by classroom and teacher and most Montessori companies have their own personalized sets of materials that are all slightly different.

Pink, Blue, and Green Series materials are easy to make at home; for suggestions, check out this post:

What Can You Do With the Language Basics?

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Categories: Montessori

Guide for color lesson Montessori in detail (color box 1,2,3)

September 21, 2013 1 comment

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Source: http://www.infomontessori.com/sensorial/visual-sense-color-tablets.htm

Color Tablets

Materials
3 boxes with lids containing color tablets:

Box 1
6 tablets; a pair of each of the primary colors (red, yellow, blue). These are the most sharply contrasted colors.

Box 2
22 tablets; a pair of each of the primary colors, the secondary colors (green, orange, purple), and also pink, brown, black, white, and grey.

Box 3:
63 tablets; 7 shades of 9 colors: red, yellow, blue, green, orange, purple, brown, pink, and grey.


Presentation Box 1

Introduction
Invite the child by telling him you have something to show him. Bring him over to the correct shelves and tell him we will be using the Color Tablets. Show the child how to carry the box with your two hands on opposite sides of the box with your fingers underneath the box and your thumbs over the top. Have the child bring the correct box and have him place it near the top right corner of the table. Have the child sit to your left and then you sit down in front of the box. Take off the lid using both hands and place it directly in front of the box. Pick up the box using both hands and place it carefully onto the lid.

Constructing
– Take the red, yellow, and blue tablets (with their matching pair) out of the box with both hands and making it evident that you are aware of not touching the color part.
– Place each tablet randomly on the table next to the box.
– Pick up the box and place it behind the lid and then pick up the lid and replace in onto the box.
– Pick up one of the red tablets using your right thumb and index finger and holding the “frame” part of the tablet.
– Place it near the top of the table and isolated from the other tablets.
– Then tell the child, “ I’m looking for one just like it.”
– Choose the other red tablets and gently place it directly next to the first red tablet.
– Then pick up the yellow tablet and place it under the first red tablet.
– Ask the child, “Can you find the one just like it?”
– Match the yellow in the same way as the red.
– Place one of the blue tablets under the first yellow tablet.

color tablets box 1

color tablets box 1

Presentation Box 2

Introduction
Now that the child has had the introduction for Box 1, have him carry Box 2 over to the table and open the box as before.

Constructing
– Take the red, yellow, blue, green, orange, and purple tablets (with their matching pair) out of the box with both hands and making it evident that you are aware of not touching the color part.
– Place each tablet randomly on the table next to the box.
– Pick up the box and place it behind the lid and then pick up the lid and replace in onto the box.
– Pick up one of the red tablets using your right thumb and index finger and holding the “frame” part of the tablet.
– Place it near the top of the table and isolated from the other tablets.
– Then ask the child to place the one that looks just like it next to it.
– Have the child choose the next color and place it directly under the first red tablet. Then you find its match.
– Have the child choose a color and then match it until all of the colors have been matched. (Show the child where to place the tablets in a new column once the first column is done.)
– Have the child close his eyes and tell him you are going to mix them up.
– Mix the tablets and place them all to the left of the box.
– Have the child match just as you had done in the presentation.
– Take out the other colors and place them randomly on the table to the left of the box.
– Have the child match these colors as well.
– When the child is finished working, have him replace the tablets back into the box, as he had done with Box 1, and then replace the box back onto the shelf.

color tablets box 2

Presentation Box 3

Introduction
Now that the child has had the introduction for Box 1 and 2, have him carry Box 3 over to the table and open the box as before.

Constructing
– Take out one shade of color (so seven tablets of the same color but of different shades).
– Place each tablet randomly on the table next to the box.
– Close the box as done for the other boxes.
– Ask the child to find the two tablets that are the most different.
– Have the child place them next to each other (to see the contrast) and in isolation from the other tablets.
– Separate them but still keep them isolated from the others.
– Point to the darkest tablet (should be on the left) and tell the child that you are looking for one that is just a little different.
– Place the correct tablet directly to the right of the darkest shade.
– Point to this new tablet and ask the child, “ Can you find the one that is just a little different than this one?”
– Continue until you and the child have successfully arranged the shades in decreasing order.
– Have the child close his eyes and you mix up the tablets.
– Have the child arrange the shades in order as shown.
Exercises Box 3

Exercise 1
The child repeats the work as shown in the presentation using other graded colors until he has done all of the 9 shades.

Exercise 2
The child takes out one set of colors to grade and you choose another set of contrasting color. Have the child grade them both. Mix up the tablets and repeat. Continue until the child has graded every two combinations possible.

Exercise 3
Place two mats next to each other. Place the disk in the center. Take the darkest of each color and place it horizontally around the disk. Grade each color outwards to create a “Star Burst”.
Games

Box 1 No Game
Box 2 Matching at a distance
Matching to the environment
Box 3 Matching to the environment
Grading from an extreme
Grading from a midpoint


Language

Names of the colors (given after the child can pair box 2 without hesitation).
After the child can grade Box 3: dark and light and later the comparatives (darker and lighter) and the superlatives (darkest and lightest).

Box 1 No Language
Box 2 Three Period Lesson for Naming:
Step 1: Choose one of each of the primary colors.
Name the colors clearly and repeat 2-4 times.
Have the child close his eyes and you mix the colors up.
Step 2: Ask the child to point to the color you ask for.
Ask the child to give you a specific color.
Ask the child to place a specific color in a specific spot.
Step 3: Ask the child, “What is this?”
Ask the child the names of all of the colors.
Mix up the colors and ask again.
Add in secondary colors:
Step 1: Quickly check for understanding of the primary colors.
Give the names of the new colors repeatedly as above.
Step 2: Check for the child’s recognition of the names of the colors as done in Step 2 above.
Step 3: Ask for the names of all of the colors more than once.
Box 3 Three Period Lesson for Grading: Positives
Have the child take out any shade of one color.
Have the child grade the color from darkest to lightest.
Mix up the tablets.
Choose two tablets of contrasting shades but not the extremes.
Step 1: In a clear voice name the correct one as dark and the
other as light.
Repeat their names.
Change one or two of the tablets so the relationship changes and name them again.
Step 2: Check for the name recognition by asking the child to show you a dark or light.
Change one of the tablets and ask for a dark or light.
Step 3: Ask the child for the names.
Change the tablets and ask again. 
Three Period Lesson for Grading: Comparative
Have the child take out any shade of one color.
Have the child grade the color from darkest to lightest.
Mix up the tablets.
Choose two tablets of contrasting shades but not the extremes.
Step 1: In a clear voice name the correct one as dark and the other as darker.
Repeat their names.
Change one or two of the tablets so the relationship changes and name them again.
Step 2: Check for the name recognition by asking the child to show you a dark or darker.
Change one of the tablets and ask for a dark or darker.
Step 3: Ask the child for the names.
Change the tablets and ask again. 
Three Period Lesson for Grading: Superlative
Have the child take out any shade of one color.
Have the child grade the color from darkest to lightest.
Mix up the tablets.
Choose three tablets of contrasting shades.
Step 1: In a clear voice name the correct one as dark and another as darker. Add in the darkest and say, “Now this one is the darkest”.
Repeat their names.
Change one or two of the tablets so the relationship changes and name them again.
Step 2: Check for the name recognition by asking the child to show you the darkest.
Change one of the tablets and ask for the darkest.
Add in a few more of the tablets and ask for the darkest. Remove that tablet and ask for the new darkest. Remove that one and repeat until you only have two left. Then ask for the darker.
Step 3: Ask the child for the name of the darkest.
Change the tablets and ask again. 

Purpose

Direct
To provide the child with a key to orient himself in the world of color.

Control of Error
The child’s ability to discriminate color.


Age
3 – 3 1/2 years for Box 1 and Box 2
3 1/2 – 4 1/2 year for Box 3

Categories: Montessori

Color learning Montessori links

September 21, 2013 7 comments
Categories: Uncategorized

How to Make Your Own Montessori Materials

September 21, 2013 1 comment

http://livingmontessorinow.com/2010/09/23/how-to-make-your-own-montessori-materials/

How to Make Your Own Montessori Materials

While there are many beautiful, wooden Montessori materials you can order online, you can go the DIY Montessori route for some or all of your Montessori materials at home. As I’ve said before, you don’t need to duplicate a Montessori school. It’s wonderful if you’re able to purchase some of the wooden materials because of their beauty and precision, but it certainly isn’t essential.

My first experience with Montessori was in a day care center using handmade materials, donated carpet pieces for rugs, and Styrofoam meat trays donated from the grocery store for the trays on the shelves. There weren’t as many educational opportunities in my Montessori-oriented day-care classroom as in a Montessori school, but the positive change in the behavior of the children was the same change I see in children attending Montessori schools or Montessori homeschools.

LINKS FOR MAKING YOUR OWN MONTESSORI MATERIALS

Books and General Montessori DIY Links:

I have a list of all the DIY Montessori materials posts I’ve published here: DIY Montessori Materials.

The best book on making your own Montessori materials is Teaching Montessori in the Home: Pre-School Years: The Pre-School Years by Elizabeth Hainstock. This is what I used to set up my Montessori classroom in a day care center.

If you want to make Montessori-based religious-education materials, I wrote a post on setting up a Godly Play classroom at home which has links to the books needed to make Montessori-based Godly Play materials.

Mont Home has photos for many DIY Montessori materials. Click on the links at the top of the page to find materials in each curriculum area.

Walk Beside Me has many DIY Montessori materials.

Making Montessori Ours has many DIY Montessori materials (see left sidebar).

There are Yahoo groups called Montessori Material Makers and Montessori By Hand especially to help with making your own Montessori materials.

The Little List has a page with links to both DIY Montessori materials and free Montessori printables.

Geometric Shapes and Shelf (shelf made using a hot glue gun – no nails or screws) - Photo by Noor Janan HomeschoolGeometric Shapes and Shelf (shelf made using a hot glue gun – no nails or screws) – Photo by Noor Janan Homeschool

My post on free Montessori materials online has links for free materials which can be downloaded and printed out. I also have a number of posts on DIY Montessori materials (photo from Geometric Shapes and Shelf by Noor Janan Homeschool in my DIY Geometric Shape roundup post) with links to resources for making specific Montessori materials.

DIY Practical Life:

Montessori for Infants and Toddlers has directions for making dressing frames.

DIY Sensorial:

What DID We Do All Day? has a link-up list with LOTS of DIY Montessori sensorial materials and associated blogs.

DIY Baby Stuff has directions for making geometric insets.

DIY Language:

What DID We Do All Day? has a link-up list with LOTS of DIY Montessori language materials and associated blogs.

I wrote an article with lots of links for making sandpaper letters and alphabet boxes.

DIY Mathematics:

What DID We Do All Day? has a link-up list with LOTS of DIY Montessori math materials and associated blogs.

The Accidental Crafter has directions for making sandpaper numerals.

New Learning Culture has directions for making cards and counters.

I have a post with lots of links about making Montessori bead material.

DIY Cultural:

What DID We Do All Day? has a link-up list with LOTS of DIY Montessori cultural materials and associated blogs.

Here’s the link to all the other posts in the Montessori Homeschool Classroom and Materials series.

Have you made your own Montessori materials, or do you plan to try making your own Montessori materials?

Categories: Montessori

How to Use Montessori Color Cards

September 21, 2013 Leave a comment

Montessori-color-cardsMontessori color cards, also known as Montessori color tablets, are used in a variety of preschool lessons for children as young as 2 years old. A set of color cards is made up of 22 cards representing the full range of colors, with pairs of red, blue, yellow, orange, purple, green, pink, grey, brown, black and white. They are stored in boxes so that a beginner can work with just a few colors, while a more experienced student can use more of the spectrum. The color cards are introduced via a simple lesson that uses only the primary colors: red, blue and yellow.

Read more: http://www.ehow.com/how_4516651_use-montessori-color-cards.html#ixzz2fUQNW1KQ

Instructions

1

Present the three sets of primary-color cards to the student. Use a table that has neutral coloring if possible, so there is little to distract him from the bright colors. The cards should be removed from the box and laid randomly on the table. Although they are not in any particular order, they should be straight up and down.

2

Show the child how to hold the card or tablet correctly by the edges. This is to prevent fading and smearing of the colors over time. Say, “Look how I hold the tablet (or card) so that I do not touch the beautiful color. Can you hold it without touching the color?” This helps preserve the colors on the cards and, in the case of silk-wrapped tablets, helps the silk colors stay bright and smudge-free.

3

Point to a card and have the child find the card that is the same. Do not use the names of the colors at this time, because the child does not yet know them. If the child selects the right matching card, place the two together side by side, saying, “Yes, these are the same. We will put them together.” If the child selects a card that does not match, place the two side by side as if to consider them, then respond, “No, these two are not the same. Find one that is just the same as this one,” while pointing to the original request.

4

Continue to match the colors until all of the colors are placed in pairs on the table. They should be lined up so that one pair is immediately above the other and the matching elements of each color are clear.

5

Repeat the exercise. If the child is hesitant, you can do the exercise with her again. After she is comfortable with the exercise, allow her to do it on her own. As her familiarity with color grows, you can add additional pairs of colors until the child is working with a complete set of paired colors.

Read more: http://www.ehow.com/how_4516651_use-montessori-color-cards.html#ixzz2fUQguGeu

Categories: Montessori